Tag: news

Stay fit, stay strong – all winter long!

tie dyebrush

If you’ve ever been to a Horse Tales “Second Touch” you know that we all learn a bit about grooming, tack, feed and keeping horses healthy.

ferrier1clippers

Here’s some more simple tips about care for your horse and other critters.
Take care of yourself – it’s cold outside. Warm up, cool down and enjoy the ride!
Be sure to leave your comments on the forum, facebook or here on the blog page.

Routine Health Care Of Horses

As loving owners, our horses mean the world to us, but without the right education looking after them properly isn’t an easy task! Here are a few things every owner should be aware of.

1) Regular Veterinary Check-Ups

It’s a good idea to schedule regular veterinary check-ups to ensure your horses stay fit and healthy, and to get much needed medicine in the event of illness. Most general health inspections should begin with nutrition. Many problems can be traced to a horse’s digestive system, which was made to process large amounts of grass, fiber, and water. A simple diet is best, and horses should get plenty of grass, high quality hay and water when they need it.

2) Food

Make sure your horse has plenty of grass and hay to graze on. Malnutrition can lead to several problems including ulcers, which are common in leaner sport horses. It is generally agreed that horses should eat between 2 and 4 percent of their body weight in hay and feed. It’s advisable to monitor their weight regularly to make sure it remains within healthy limits.

3) Vaccination & Deworming

Horses should be vaccinated and dewormed at regular intervals to prevent deadly viruses and parasite infections. The vaccinations needed can vary depending on the horse’s lifestyle. Deworming is particularly important due to how common parasite infections are, and because they can result in weight loss, colic and other dangerous symptoms.

4) Social Life, Excercise & General Wellbeing

Horses need to be social and around others or they could develop emotional and mental problems. They need regular mental stimulation and should receive adequate exercise to ensure they grow up as healthy as possible. Carefully monitor your horse’s sleeping patterns to make sure they aren’t out of the ordinary as strange sleeping patterns can be a symptom of illness or anxiety.

Unless it is particularly wet and windy outside, horses stand the cold better than hot weather. If they cannot sweat, their bodies may have trouble getting rid of excess heat.

5) Medicines

It’s a good idea to stock up on safe, versatile medicines such as Benadryl (containing diphenhydramine only). Purchasing antihistamines for horses can come in handy to counteract blood pressure problems and allergic reactions that would otherwise harm your animal, but should only be administered when you have approval from a veterinary professional. The right types of antihistamines do not block active histamines, and instead compete with them for the receptor to keep your horses healthy. As an added bonus, you can also safely use antihistamines on household pets, meaning you can keep Fido’s summer-time allergies under control too!

Summertime and the livin’ is sweaty!

trouble

black_stallion

Too hot to be busy but what choice do we have?? Someone has to get them fed and watered! Let’s head to the river …or better yet, the beach!
Did you see the video of the Arabian Nights sales last weekend?
The end of an era, kinda sad, but the horses are all going to great new homes!!!
Take a look and drop us a line on the forum when you get a second (or facebook, too)

Stop on by and visit sometime!!

 

Preakness 2014

 

a rosie139th Preakness Stakes - Previews cali chrome

Today is the second jewel in the Triple Crown today so save a few minutes this afternoon to see the excitement.
Is it going to be California history with California Chrome? Is he going to pull an Orb and fade in the race books? Or ala Big Brown keep us hoping for that special horse of the year that he can do it all in the next three weeks? Or will it be Rosie’s day?

Not since those heady days of 1977 with Seattle Slew and the very NEXT YEAR, in 1978, with the dual between Alydar and Affirmed have we had the pleasure of a Triple Crown winner.

Maybe an Exacta Box of Social Inclusion and California Chrome?
If you want to always pick a winner choose – “The Black Stallion”!

Where: Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, Maryland
When: Saturday, May 17 at 6:18 p.m. ET
Watch: NBC
Live Stream: NBC Sports Live Extra

 

2014 Preakness Stakes Field
Entries for Preakness Stakes 2014 Post Horse Jockey Trainer Odds
1 Dynamic Impact           Miguel Mena Mark E. Casse 12-1
2 General a Rod            Javier Castellano Mike Maker 15-1
3 California Chrome      Victor Espinoza Art Sherman 3-5
4 Ring Weekend           Alan Garcia H. Graham Motion 20-1
5 Bayern                       Rosie Napravnik Bob Baffert 10-1
6 Ria Antonia               Calvin Borel Tom Amoss 30-1
7 Kid Cruz                   Julian Pimentel Linda Rice 20-1
8 Social Inclusion        Luis Contreras Manny Azpurua 5-1
9 Pablo Del Monte       Jeffrey Sanchez Wesley A. Ward 20-1
10 Ride on Curlin        Joel Rosario William Gowan 10-1
Betting / The Basics:

Win:
Selecting the winner of the race. Your horse must win in order for you to cash a ticket.

Place:
If your horse wins or comes in second you cash a ticket, but you get only the place payout.

Show:
If your horse comes in first, second or third you cash a ticket, but you get only the show payout.

WPS:
Stands for “win, place, show”, also known as “across the board”. This places a win, place and show bet on your selection, which is three wagers. I like to think of this as an “ease of use” wager. If your horse wins you get the win, place AND show payout. You’d say “$2 across the board on #3″ to place this wager.

Exotic Bets – Single Race

Exacta:
Selecting the first and second place finishers in exact order.

Quinella:
Selecting the first and second place finishers in either order (if you select #7 & #9 you cash a ticket as long as both finish first and second).

Trifecta:
Selecting the first, second and third place finishers in exact order.

Superfecta:
Selecting the first, second, third and forth place finishers in exact order.

Box:
For any of the single race exotics you can “box” your wager. This means that any of your selections can finish in any order depending on the wager. For example an exacta box is similar to quinella in that as long as your selections run one and two you cash a ticket. A two horse exacta box is two wagers and therefore costs double the money. Accordingly and to your benefit, it pays more than the quinella. A $2 exacta box of two horses is $4. A $1 trifecta box of three horses is $6. You can box as many horses as you like, but it can get pricey!

Key:
Used with exactas, trifectas and superfectas, you select a single horse to win (the key) and other horses to come in second, third and fourth depending on the wager.

Wheel:
A wheel is similar to a key, just with more horses and potentially variations in the how you position the horses. With this type of wager you’d select more than one horse in the top spot, essentially “wheeling” horses “up and down” – or placing a horse in more than one position in your wagers.

For example, you could have a trifecta that looks like this: 2,5 / 2,5,7 / 1,7,9. In this case you would need #2 or #5 to win, either of those two or #7 to come in second and #1, #7 or #9 to show. If you place a $1 wager in this configuration would cost you $18 (2 horses in first position x 3 horses in second position x 3 horses in third position).

 

Exotic Bets – Multiple Race
Daily Double:
Selecting the winner in two consecutive races.
Pick 3:
Selecting the winner in three consecutive races.
Pick 4:
Selecting the winner in four consecutive races.
Pick 6:
Selecting the winner in six consecutive races.

Goodbye Mr. Rooney :-{

carrollmickeyscript

 

atbs

MickeyHat

Mickey Rooney passed away yesterday, a sad loss to the entire entertainment world. Mickey started at two years old and was still making movies this year at 93! His legacy will endure as history has already shown. His performance as Henry Dailey, with Kelly Reno as Alec Ramsay, in Carroll Ballard’s classic “The Black Stallion” for MGM /UA brought an Oscar nomination for Mickey, many yeas after he was a an MGM contract actor. His work when he was the young heartthrob for the studio only  brought him a marriage to young Ava Gardner – every inch a classic at 5 foot three!

I had the pleasure and honor to ride to the set every day with Mickey and heard a lot of his wonderful stories as the miles swept by. Sometimes those rides were the highlight of my day … and that’s saying something as those were exciting days. To see him perform, a true entertainer, singer, dancer & actor was a treat not to be forgotten. He had boundless energy that shows in every frame of film.

After his work on “Black Stallion” in 1979 Mickey went on to Broadway with Ann Miller and “Sugar Babies”, a tribute to his song and dance Vaudeville roots. It was a hit running for over three years with rave reviews and awards.

In 1988 we had the pleasure to team up with Mr. Rooney again with the TV show “Adventures of the Black Stallion” for a three year series. Mickey continued his role as Henry Dailey with Richard Cox as Alec.

Here’s a great article on Mickey – good or bad boy – he was a REAL original;

Mickey Rooney Was the Last Old Hollywood Star Standing

He was an astonishing actor, a galvanized entertainer and a star who could never diminish his own glory (though he tried). He was Puck and Baby Face Nelson—only in America. But it is not enough to say that we have lost an actor, a vaudevillian, an artist, and a national treasure. It is the force that is gone, and the sense of that force as part of our history. We know what it is to admit that there is no one left alive who fought in the trenches of the Great War. Soon there will be no one left who existed in a Nazi concentration camp. So Mickey Rooney was the last male left alive who had been a true star and a phenomenon in the 1930s, when Hollywood believed it ran the show and had established the idea of some spunky, brilliant kids doing it. After all, the show was hardly a thing for which one could expect adult participation.

Joseph Yule Jr. was ninety-three at the end; he had been five-feet-two once; and there had been eight wives and nine children, many of whom may have tottered away from the experience in exhaustion and disbelief. He was not easygoing, and not restrained by reality or fact. In the late ’30s, when he was the number 3 champion at the box office (following Clark Gable and Shirley Temple), he let it be known that Mickey Mouse had been named after him. Walt Disney did not recall it that way, but why would anyone attend to his rather grim, clerical manner when the wide eyes and the wider imagination of the Mick were on offer? Years after the death of Judy Garland, Rooney looked back on their screen association. He said their love affair—which had never been an affair—was intense beyond description. It meant, he said, in 1992, that Judy was not really or exactly or simply dead. She lived on in him. Such talk is easily taken as show business hyperbole, and by 1992 that had become an alien language. But the truth is that Mick meant it. He believed. Stranger  things had happened—notably the way he was Andy Hardy in fourteen films at MGM, as well as Judy’s partner in films where the couple put on a show, climaxing in Babes in Arms, which was one of the biggest box-office hits of 1939, even bigger than The Wizard of Oz.

Mickey Rooney

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Mickey Rooney and Ava Gardner in 1942.

The story of how MGM and its father figure, Louis B. Mayer, tried to keep Mickey and Judy kids forever and out of trouble would make an astonishing movie. There is only one drawback to the plan: No one now can match or understand the ferocious acting-out dynamic of all three parties. Mayer may have hoped that the vast sexual energy in both kids might be married off, but Mickey became a serial marrier. He started with Ava Gardner, who was nowhere near a star yet and was four inches taller than he was. He moved on to Martha Vickers, who is Carmen Sternwood in The Big Sleep, the nymph who tries to sit down in Bogart’s lap while he’s still standing up. The mere idea of Mickey and Martha together (1949-52) tends to eclipse the nuclear testing that was so popular at that time. I know, that’s excessive and vulgar, but we are talking about Mickey Rooney.

Anyone would have anticipated that the Mick would burn out. By about 1950, the generation of child stars he had grown up with were looking for careers in stockbroking and settled marriages. Judy was cracking up, but Shirley Temple, Freddie Bartholomew, Deanna Durbin and Jackie Cooper were all facing up to reality. Rooney went broke—god knows what happened to his money. He should have subsided, or come to a bad end. He never stopped. Only a few years ago, I was driving in rural Oregon and came to a settlement, with a casino and dinner theatre, and there he was doing one of his shows.

That view of his undying thunderstorm could be amused and patronizing, so let me just say to those who hardly knew him and who lack the time to track down everything he did—he has 340 credits on IMDb—try these (going back in time):

Mickey Rooney

Express Newspapers/Getty Images
Rooney in 1971.

Carroll Ballard’s The Black Stallion is a film that never fails with audiences. One reason why is that after the lyrical stuff on the island with the horse and the boy, the story moves on to horse-racing where Mick is the trainer who teaches the boy to be a jockey on the Black for the big race. It is one of the finest tributes to education in American cinema.

In 1957, for the big screen, he was the lead in Don Siegel’s Baby Face Nelson—brilliant, hilarious, demonic; and in the same year, on the small screen, directed by John Frankenheimer from a Rod Serling script, he did The Comedian for Playhouse 90—monstrous, inspired, terrifying.

Last, let it be first. In the Max Reinhart film of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, made at Warner Brothers in 1936, he was Puck. Many years ago, an English critic said of that performance, “Rooney seems inhuman, he moves like mist or water, his body is burnished by the extraordinary light, and his gurgling laugh is ghostly and enchanting.” Let that stand.

One co-star in the Dream was Olivia de Havilland, and she is still alive and (I hope) very well (she is the last female star from that era). I’m not sure if they met during the filming, but it’s pretty and tempting to picture the two of them together—Mickey sixteen, Olivia nineteen—with her offering him advice to calm down, behave and think of his career, while knowing that he was not going to do one damn thing she told him.

We’ll all miss you Mr. Rooney – but we’ll see you at the movies.
Tim, Kelly, Carroll, Doug, Caleb, Fred, Tom …  and all your Black Stallion friends!